Report: Houthis continue to deploy naval mines in Red Sea 

According to reports online, a network of naval mines was planted on the sea floor in relatively shallow waters about 15 meters deep 

Recently, the Arab coalition forces of Egypt and Saudi Arabia, which are operating in the area of the Red Sea and the Arabian Sea, discovered another naval minefield, according to reports online. The minefield was discovered in the southern part of the Red Sea adjacent to the Bab el-Mandeb Strait, which is one of the naval chokepoints through which the majority of maritime trade between Asia and Europe passes, and thus is a vital route for world trade.  

The minefield included a network that was planted on the sea floor in relatively shallow waters (about 15 meters deep) located several hundred meters from the coast. The network included 200kg mines that were attached to one another. Each mine was equipped with a sensor that activated the mine if it detected changes in the electromagnetic stream and/or acoustic sound resulting from the passage of ships. The mines that were discovered were dismantled.   

The minefield is suspected of being laid by the naval force of Yemen's Houthi rebels that are operating against the regime in Yemen as well as Egypt and Saudi Arabia. The Houthis are a terrorist organization operating under the auspices of Iran, which finances the group's operations and provides it with equipment. In recent months, Hezbollah helped establish eight new bases for the organization's naval force and trained dozens of Houthi fighters while setting up a new naval commando force for the organization.     

In recent years, dozens of naval mines planted by the organization have been discovered in the Red Sea and the Arabian Sea. The laying of naval mines by the Houthis is a significant threat to both military and civilian ships operating in the area, including Israeli merchant ships heading to or from Asia that pass through the Red Sea. 

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