Concern over possible coup in Chad; US pulling out diplomats 

Opponents of the regime are approaching the capital after the results of the country's general election showed that President Idriss Deby, who has been in power for 30 years, will continue in his post 

President of Chad Idriss Deby. Photo: Ludovic Marin/Pool via REUTERS 

There is concern over a possible coup in Chad, the African country in the Sahara. The U.S. is pulling out some of its embassy's staff in N'djamena, the country's capital, while Britain is urging its citizens to leave the country. Units of opponents of the regime, Islamic extremists, are approaching the capital and other cities after the results of the country's general elections showed that President Idriss Deby, who has been in power for 30 years, will continue in his post.   

The president's son, General Abdelkarim Deby, visited Israel last year, met with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Intelligence Minister Eli Cohen, and promised that his country would open a diplomatic office in Jerusalem soon.  

President Deby, who seized power in 1990, cooperates with France and the US in the struggle against Islamic extremist opponents of the regime in the Sahel region of the Sahara desert. The U.S. State Department announced Sunday that non-essential staff at its embassy in N'djamena would leave the country. 

Reuters reported that a convoy of the Islamic insurgents was seen approaching the city of Mao, about 200km north of the capital. Heavily-armed military and security units are patrolling the streets of N'djamena, and the military announced that it already destroyed a convoy of opponents of President Deby, who has suppressed several rebellions against him. The French Air Force helped him defeat rebels who came from Libya in the beginning of 2019.    

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