Libya: lights and shadows of the peace process

Commentary: The parties involved in the Tunis talks were willing to respect the truce but little inclined to make political concessions to their counterparts. Uncertainty hangs over the Libyan peace process in which the role of the national players is often influenced and manipulated by the various international sponsors

Libya: lights and shadows of the peace process

Troops loyal to the Tripoli government patrol the area near Abu Qareen, Libya in September. Photo: REUTERS/Ayman Al-Sahili

After six days of intense closed-door talks between the 75 delegates of the various Libyan factions summoned to Tunis by the Acting Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General (SRSG), Stephanie Williams, the first round of negotiations that ended on November 15 confirmed the "ceasefire", but failed to reach an agreement on the mechanisms and criteria for selecting the candidates for a new "national unity" government. 

Acting SRSG Stephanie Williams has decided to reconvene in the coming days - via video conference - a second round of what has been called the "Libyan Political Dialogue Forum" (LPDF), with the ambition of succeeding in forming a government able to manage the national elections scheduled for December 24, 2021.

While admitting the partial failure of the Tunis talks, the U.S. diplomat declared frankly that it was not "realistically possible to find solutions to a ten-year conflict in a simple round of negotiations". Nevertheless, Acting SRSG Stephanie Williams has stressed that "there seems to be the possibility of an agreement on three important sensitive aspects of the negotiation, i.e. the tasks and duties of the new government; the criteria for appointing those who will take up the government posts and the roadmap for the peace process.

She added that “Libyan politicians now have the opportunity to effectively occupy center stage or end up going extinct as dinosaurs". 

Tough words that convey the disappointment for a negotiation that sees the parties involved (the Tripoli government led by Fayez al-Sarraj; the Tobruk faction commanded by General Khalifa Haftar and the Fezzan independent tribes) willing to respect the armed truce, but little inclined to make political concessions to their counterparts.

Certainly it was not easy to make the Libyan stakeholders - who, until last summer, had been fighting one another in open field - converge on a political dialogue path.  

It was not easy also due to the behind-the-scenes activism of the international sponsors of the opposing factions: Turkey and Qatar in favour of al-Sarraj; Saudi Arabia, the Gulf States, Egypt and Russia supporting the "Libyan National Army" led by General Haftar, while President Macron’s France is openly siding with the Fezzan tribes.

During the Tunis talks, all delegates systematically leaked to the press fake drafts of possible agreements, in view of thwarting the proposals of their counterparts.

According to "Agenzia Nova", apparently official documents were circulated containing references to the topics actually under discussion, “polluted” by totally invented parts: "real poisoned drafts received from Libyan sources close to General Haftar".

 Malicious rumours have also spread about the possible corruption of some delegates, bribed with many dollars to favor the appointment of Abdullh al-Dabaiba - the powerful "warlord" of Misrata and founder of the "Future for Libya" movement - to the new government. It should be recalled that, thanks to Turkish weapons and Islamist mercenaries brought by President Erdogan to Libya from Syria, Misrata’s militias rescued al-Sarraj’s government from collapse when last April General Haftar’s militias had arrived at Tripoli’s gates.

However, despite the difficulties, in her report to the UN Security Council, Acting SRSG Stephanie Williams also highlighted some positive aspects of the situation on the ground.

First of all, the military truce is holding out: there are no significant violations of the "ceasefire", while "the exchange of prisoners continues, facilitated by the Council of Elders, with the support of the Joint Military Commission.

Another important result has been achieved in the oil sector: with the agreement of all the parties involved, the National Oil Company has resumed oil production in full swing, which has quickly returned to last year's level of 1.2 million. However, the transparent distribution of oil revenues must be postponed until an agreement is reached between all the parties involved, pending which the National Oil Company shall set aside the proceeds from oil sale in a special UN-controlled account.

This is a sensitive aspect regarding directly Italy: the resumption of crude oil extraction means much for ENI which - albeit left alone by national institutions to operate in the dangerous situation of tension between the opposing Libyan factions - has managed to establish itself as a credible and reliable counterpart and to maintain its extraction, production and refining activities in Libya.

While concluding her briefing to the UN Security Council, Acting SRSG Stephanie Williams underlined: "Seventy-five Libyans came together in Tunis ... in a good faith effort to start the process of healing their nation’s wounds. ... they extended their hands, if not their hearts, to each other".  

"Not their hearts": this is the deepest shadow hanging over the Tunis talks, casting uncertainty over a peace process in which the role of the national players is often influenced and manipulated by the various international sponsors - and the sponsors certainly do not act for "heart" reasons.

On the Tripoli government’s front, the two key allies are President Erdogan's Turkey and Qatar ruled by young Emir Tamin bin Hamad Al Thani.

 Despite the accession of the former to NATO and of the latter to the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), the two countries have embraced the cause of Muslim extremism by more or less openly supporting jihadist militias during the civil conflicts in Syria, Iraq and, most recently, Libya.

At the side of these awkward travel companions, in a quiet and secluded corner, we can find Italy which, in 2016, with an undoubtedly politically correct move, followed the United Nations, which imposed a neo-colonialist governmental solution on Libya, by establishing al-Sarraj’s "Government of National Accord" (GNA), at first in Tunis and later in Tripoli. A "neo-colonialist" solution because the GNA has not been recognized by any of Tripoli’s and Tobruk’s Parliaments and has never been legitimized by elections or supported by the people.

Over the last four years, while al-Sarraj barely controlled the capital, the Italian diplomacy has not seemed able to find a clear policy and line of action, in a region of vital importance for the country, other than that of "respect for UN resolutions", a formal pretext used also by the European Union to justify its inaction.

As said above, faced with Turkey’s and Qatar’s political and military commitment to support al-Sarraj, but above all the Islamist militias of Tripoli and Misrata, the Gulf States have broken diplomatic relations with Qatar, accusing its Emir of an adventurous conduct in favour of the "Muslim Brotherhood" throughout the region.

Furthermore, together with Egypt, France and Russia, the Gulf States have actually established an alliance to protect two of the three Libyan political-military components, i.e. General Haftar’s "Libya Liberation Army" and the militias linked to the Fezzan tribes with whom France has established an almost exclusive partnership.

While the diplomacies interested in the Middle East are playing on several tables - just think of the new relations between the Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and above all Saudi Arabia, with Israel - Italy and Europe - probably also because of the pandemic - seem to be immobilized and bogged down into passive positions of principle on the positive aspects of "multilateralism".

Indeed. the other countries are taking action also in view of possible political and economic dividends in the future, while Italy and Europe, with their wait-and-see attitude, remain on the sidelines to watch - as mere spectators - the development of events that will have a decisive impact on the new Mediterranean equilibria of the near future.

Nevertheless, there seem to be no good news about U.S. international commitments in the "after-Trump era".

The new President, Joe Biden, has appointed Antony Blinken as the new Secretary of State.

Despite his being an educated, cosmopolitan and polite person, we cannot forget that, during Obama’s Presidencies, Blinken was a close aide of Hillary Clinton, at first, and of John Kerry, later, i.e. two negative protagonists of international relations and foreign policy who, with their naïve support for the fake "Arab Springs", contributed to upset North Africa and the Middle East in the name of a mirage that saw an unattainable goal of Western democracy for the countries experiencing Islamist civil uprisings and unrest.

After having fomented and militarily supported the revolt against Colonel Gaddafi, the U.S. Department of State led by Hillary Clinton, had to face the sacrifice of its ambassador in Libya, Chris Stevens, who was killed on September 11, 2012 in Benghazi, where he had been sent for a confused and botched negotiation with the Islamists of Ansar Al Sharia

Under Kerry's leadership, with Blinken at his side as Deputy Secretary of State, the United States managed the Syrian crisis in a politically and militarily unwise manner, thus finally leaving the field open to Russia and Turkey.

Against this backcloth, the prospects for a return to action of U.S. diplomacy (partly put to rest by Donald Trump) are not particularly fascinating, in an area such as Libya where Italy, in its own small way, is not even able to sketch out a credible negotiation for the release of the eighteen fishermen from Mazara del Vallo, kidnapped by General Haftar’s forces for over two months.

 

Professor Valori is President of the International World Group

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