Who Protects the Sea Ports

Commentary: Nowadays, it is not possible to rely solely on passport checks or physical examinations in airports or seaports to prevent potential future attacks. Significant and sensitive facilities ought to receive real-time information about any unusual activity or object which will enter their premises, and by using cyber and OSINT intelligence technologies, it is now possible.

Uri Boros, CEO of BLER Systems. Photo provided by the company

By Uri Boros

On March 14, 2004, two Palestinian terrorists, equipped with explosive belts, entered the Ashdod seaport located in southern Israel. The terrorists were able to enter Israel via the Gaza strip, despite the massive security arrangements hidden in a double-walled container. Ten Israelis were killed during this attack.

This event was a clear-cut reminder of the daily threat which seaports, army bases, and other military facilities were still facing in the global war against terrorism and required advanced and innovative technological security solutions. 

Over the past decade, many advanced security systems and new technologies were embedded in the security array of seaports around the world, but none of which was able to provide previous intelligence on possible future threats. 

Today's extensive use of the internet and social media, combined with the latest advanced technologies, makes it possible to collect, cross-reference and target data and information on suspected objectives or identify unusual activity based on information gathered from the internet and social networks. BLER Systems is an example of such a company that makes use of the enormous amount of information flow shared on social media and online network applications to detect, locate and target potential threats to public welfare or homeland security. 

The information gathered is then analyzed and used to create a detailed profile of suspects, which helps to gain a deeper understanding of their behavioral patterns while identifying other potential threats as well.

Nowadays, it is not possible to rely solely on passport checks or physical examinations in airports or seaports to prevent potential future attacks. Significant and sensitive facilities ought to receive real-time information about any unusual activity or object which will enter their premises, and by using cyber and OSINT intelligence technologies, it is now possible.  

For example, if a person passes through a specific port, checks in an enemy state, or is photographed with a weapon or posts a hate mail on social media - the system knows to identify and alert this objective as a potential threat.  Moreover, if a young person wants to penetrate a seaport and uploads a video on one of the networks sharing his intentions, the system will know to locate him and prevent the attack even before he arrives at the port.

In conclusion, if previously it was difficult to secure and protect strategic areas that are prone to disruptions and attacks such as seaports or other sensitive facilities, today, there are new technologies out there that meet the need to produce another security layer which helps locate the next potential saboteur, even before he reaches the port to carry out the attack.

 

Uri Boros is the CEO and co-founder of BLER Systems
 

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