Milipol 2019: Autonomous Patrolling System by CopterPIX PRO Wins Innovation Award

Israeli Ambassador to France Aliza Bin-Noun at the CopterPIX booth at Milipol 2019 (Photo: Eyal Boguslavsky)

CopterPIX PRO, an Israeli boutique workshop that specializes in the design, development, and manufacturing of unique and advanced drone and VTOL solutions for special missions, launches two new systems at Milipol 2019 currently taking place in Paris.

One of the new systems, the APS250 Autonomous Patrolling System, won the Milipol 2019 Innovation Award. The system is based on a 250g micro-drone with day/night capabilities.

The company also launched the ERE95 Pro drone, which has a maximum payload capacity of 10kg, can operate for more than 60 minutes, and can reach a speed of up to 100 km/h.

“Our unique drones fly at least 25%-40% longer than any commercial drone on the market, equipped with the world’s leading day/night cameras, real-time image processing, precise landing, unique GC, and unique docking stations,” says Alon Svirsky, CopterPIX PRO CEO.

“CopterPIX PRO’s CPX open architecture and SDK package enables fast deployment of tailored solutions,” Svirsky added. “The framework is implemented with all our solutions use the same architecture, from tactic drones that weigh less than 250g up to big heavy lifters that weigh 40kg. Each drone is equipped with a CPX air companion unit enabling advanced computing capabilities used for image processing, AI, encryption, encoding, and tailored dedicated solutions. In addition, our engineering team could easily integrate third-party components. Each unit comes with a ready-to-use Wi-Fi communication component, with an extensive 5KM-10KM range, LTE, dual gimbaled day/night camera FHD X10 ZOOM/thermal 640X480, and dedicated ground control.”

 

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