SIPRI: Israel Ranks Eighth Largest Arms Exporter in the World

Over the past decade, Israeli arms exports increased by 60%, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Barak 8 missile system (Archive photo: IAI)

In 2018, Israel was the eighth largest arms exporter in the world, according to the annual arms transfer report released Monday by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

Israel was the 7th largest exporter of weapons in the world between 2014 and 2017, According to SIPRI’s previous annual report, accounting for 3.1% of the global arms trade, up from 2.1% in the four years prior. The five largest suppliers—the US, Russia, France, Germany, and China—made up 75% of all arms exports.

Over the past decade, Israeli arms exports increased by 60%, according to SIPRI’s report. In comparison, American arms exports increased by nearly 30%, and Russia saw a 17% decrease in its outgoing arms trade.

The export of Israeli arms reached $9.2 billion in 2017, up 41.5% from 2016, according to data released by the Israeli ministry of defense in May. The striking increase was bolstered by $2 billion worth of missile system deals between IAI and India.

Three Israeli weapon manufacturers were among the 100 companies worldwide to make the most money by selling arms in 2017, according to SIPRI. Elbit Systems ranked 28th on the list, IAI snagged the 41st spot, while Rafael Advanced Defense Systems ranked 45th.

The world’s largest weapons importers are Saudi Arabia, India, and Egypt. Israel supplied 15% of India’s arms imports from 2014-2018, compared to just 12% from the US, according to the report.

Israel was the world’s 15th largest weapons importer during this period. According to SIPRI, 64% of Israeli arms imports between 2014 and 2018 came from the US.

 

First publication: calcalistech.com

You might be interested also

Putin, Rouhani, and Erdogan at the Sochi Summit of February 2019 (Photo: AP)

The Day after Tomorrow

The regional reality after the withdrawal of the US forces from Syria is in the process of being reshaped with Iran, Turkey, and Russia remaining as the primary triangle in the Middle East. Special column by Amir Rapaport on the implications to Israel's national security policy