EU Moves Closer to Mandatory Biometric ID Cards

The European Council and Parliament have reached provisional agreements on new rules for the introduction of mandatory biometric national identity cards

Image: Bigstock

The biometric revolution in Europe is moving ahead with the introduction of mandatory biometric national identity cards, according to a report by consilium.europa.eu.

“Under the proposed new rules, identity cards will have to be produced in a uniform, credit card format (ID-1), include a machine-readable zone, and follow the minimum security standards set out by ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization). They will also need to include a photo and two fingerprints of the cardholder, stored in a digital format, on a contactless chip. ID cards will indicate the country code of the member state issuing them, inside an EU flag,” the European Council said in a release.

“Identity cards will have a minimum period of validity of 5 years and a maximum period of validity of 10 years. Member states may issue ID cards with a longer validity for persons aged 70 and above. If issued, ID cards for minors may have a period of validity of less than 5 years.”

“The EU is upgrading the Visa Information System (VIS) – which is currently used to hold information on all applicants for short-stay Schengen visas – to now include information on long-stay visas and residence documents; to enforce mandatory biometrics in long-stay visas (currently a national competence); and to include the fingerprints of children from the age of six and up. All visa applicants will also be profiled,” Planet Biometrics adds.

 

[First publication: Statewatch]