The UK purchased Rafael's Battle Management C4I System

Rafael will supply the UK with its Modular, Integrated C4I Air & Missile Defense System (MIC4AD), which was originally developed for the Iron Dome air defense system

A future local area air defence system launcher prepares to launch a common anti-air modular missile during trials [Picture: MBDA]

According to janes.com, the UK Ministry of Defense Joint Sensor and Engagement Networks Team has awarded Rafael Advanced Defense Systems the contract to deliver the battle management command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (BMC4I) Phase II element of the UK Sky Sabre ground-based air defense (GBAD) requirement. The BMC4I was developed by the mPrest Company, which is partially owned by Rafael.

According to the USD 79.1 million contract, Rafael will supply its Modular, Integrated C4I Air & Missile Defense System (MIC4AD) as the BMC4I solution for Sky Sabre. MIC4AD is core architecture for integration of the networked Land Ceptor air defense missile, the Saab Giraffe Agile Multi-Beam (AMB) medium-range 3D radar surveillance system, and other key sensors systems as required by the UK customer.

The Land Ceptor contract with MBDA capability is delivered through the MBDA Common Anti-Air Modular Missile (CAMM). Equipped with an active radar frequency seeker, CAMM is a next-generation air defense missile designed for land, sea, and air environments; in its land-based application (Land Ceptor) it will replace the Rapier Field Standard C surface-to-air missile system and, in British Army service, form the core of the land-based air defense capability for the UK Royal Artillery. The UK Royal Navy equivalent is designated Sea Ceptor.

The provisions of the Phase II contract require a GBAD capability along with initial support solution for up to five years. This includes delivery of a BMC4I functionality integrated with networked Land Ceptor launchers into a primary Fire Control Centre (FCC). The FCC will be the primary command and control (C2) for missile engagements within the context of a wider Air Defense C2 Battle Management environment.

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